The Family: The Brotherhood
By Donte M McNeal

Based in Michigan, Donte's Playground is a blog by Donte M McNeal. His posts range from nonsensical ramblings about anime, in-depth reviews of books and television/film, to random spurts of philosophical babble.

The Perfect Tear Review

The Perfect Tear Review

The Perfect Tear cover

The Perfect Tear cover

First off, I’d like to say that I enjoyed The Perfect Tear. It was the first book I read by Lansberg, and I believe it is her debut work, but the remarkable thing is, it doesn’t really seem like it. In The Perfect Tear, we have beings of higher densities, who are basically what we would consider supernatural beings—something akin to angels of creation who are in a competition to determine who controls the universe. The competition takes the story to earth, and in comes our heroine, Eleanor.

She is tasked with saving the world from ruin, thanks to the meddling of these beings of higher densities, and it proves to be quite the tall task for a sixteen-year-old girl who doesn’t even really understand what she’s supposed to do, or how she’s supposed to go about doing it. We follow her on a journey that has her meet new friends and encounter new enemies, all the while trying to figure out who to trust, and figure out how she can save the world from an unnatural decimation that seems unstoppable.

Lansberg does an excellent job with the world-building in this story, as well as crafting believable characters. One of the things that speaks to a reader is a character who struggles, a character who fights tooth and nail and refuses to give up even when things seems bleak. To watch Eleanor go from an adventurous little girl to a young woman willing to face the destruction of the world is a sight to behold, and the fact that her journey is not an easy one makes following it that much more satisfying.

The thing that keeps me from rating The Perfect Tear as a must-read, is that given the set-up/premise, it doesn’t really seem like Eleanor or her friends are at the risk of losing their lives. Sure, the world is falling apart around them, but you get the sense that they’ll come out the other end of it alright. I don’t know what it is about the writing that hints at this sort of outcome, but the tension I know I should have felt throughout the book, just wasn’t there. And that disappointed me, especially when this book was pitched to me as a Lord of the Rings, except with girls. It just didn’t feel like the stakes were high enough for these characters, and that’s saying something when the fate of the world hangs in the balance. It’s the type of I book I enjoyed reading once, but likely wouldn’t return to. Though, if a sequel were to be written, I would like to see the fallout of the things that occurred in this one.

"Everyone Dies At The End" Review

"Everyone Dies At The End" Review

Glitch Fiends Review

Glitch Fiends Review