The Family: The Brotherhood
By Donte M McNeal

Based in Michigan, Donte's Playground is a blog by Donte M McNeal. His posts range from nonsensical ramblings about anime, in-depth reviews of books and television/film, to random spurts of philosophical babble.

Liz Long's "SuperNova"

Liz Long's "SuperNova"

It’s weird that there aren’t more books written about vigilantes, which is odd considering how flooded (some would say oversaturated but I’m not one of them) the market is with superhero stories. Or maybe I’m just not looking in the right places. Nonetheless, Liz Long’s SuperNova is one of those few stories.

In SuperNova, we have the titular character, Nova, having witnessed the murder of her darling little sister at the hands of a monstrous criminal by the name of Fortune. In hindsight, I can see how on the nose that name is… Anyway, the story centers on Nova, as well as the other lead, Cole, as they work together to find and put down/take care of Fortune. But how can teens take down a seasoned criminal who has a superpower? Ah, I forgot to mention that did I? Well, yes, Fortune has a superpower, but he’s not alone. The world is teeming with superpowered individuals, or as Cole refers to them, “gifted.” Oh, and Nova, Cole and his younger sister Penelope are a few of these gifted individuals.

So, we follow Nova, who has an admittedly awesome name, as she stumbles through learning more about herself and her powers, living a double life as a vigilante and experiencing the usual ups and downs of high school, including crushes, jealousy, and of course, love. On top of all that, her purpose in life is to hunt down the man who took her sister from her and bring him to justice, by her own hands. Certainly a cool premise. Sadly, the end result left a bit to be desired.

I’d be lying if I said the approach on the powers of the book weren’t simple, because they are, all the way down to their straightforward and underwhelming names. Still, that’s better than being overly complicated I suppose. Apart from the powers, I can’t say there was much more that stood out. The characters, while entertaining at times, were cliché, one-note and forgettable. I don’t know, it just seems all of them could be summed up in a few words, and I need more than that in a character.

The plot was easy to follow, the pacing mostly steady throughout, and the though the twists weren’t that hard to see coming, I don’t think that this was a bad read. It wasn’t particularly groundbreaking, but I had a good time with it. They aren’t high up on my tbr, but I’ll be getting the sequels in the future.

The Greatness of "Persona 5"

The Greatness of "Persona 5"

Travis Bagwell's "Catharsis (Awaken Online #1)"

Travis Bagwell's "Catharsis (Awaken Online #1)"